Graph shows our resolutions are doomed

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4 Year Old Shares Brilliant New Year’s Resolution Message1:54

Often, the problem with New Year’s resolutions are that people set overly-ambitious goals in unexpected timeframes. Rather, we should go easy on ourselves and seek to gradually improve all year round. Funnily enough, these are the wise words of a very clever four-year-old in Australia! Ming Dao Ting and his adorable little daughter made this lovely video and if you’re looking for some early inspiration this year, then look no further. Credit: YouTube/Tingman via Storyful

The graph that shows when our New Year’s resolutions fall in a heap.

HOW’S that new gym membership going for you? Still committed to pumping iron three times a week?

And cutting out the smokes and cracking down on the booze? You’re on track, right?

Well, enjoy the new you while you can because figures released today have revealed the point at which Australians give up the New Year’s resolutions.

It’s the moment when good intentions go on the scrapheap and we return to indulging in all those sins that are bad for us.

According to the US-based International Health, Racquet, and Sportsclub Association (IHRSA), 12 per cent of all gym memberships are taken out in January compared to around 8 per cent during other months.

Yet only 18 per cent of those new members use the gym consistently meaning more than one-in-five people basically purchase gym memberships for no reason.

Be like personal trainer Renee Ker and stick to your New Year's resolutions. Picture: Marc McCormack

Be like personal trainer Renee Ker and stick to your New Year’s resolutions. Picture: Marc McCormackSource:News Corp Australia

The Commonwealth Bank figures, released to news.com.au, show that gym memberships do indeed sky rocket in the New Year.

Looking at 2016, 69 per cent more CommBank customers took out gym memberships in January compared to December. While 45 per cent less was spent on cigarettes and alcohol in the New Year than the previous month.

“Our data shows that New Year’s resolutions really do get put into action as people return from the holiday period, take a break from the booze and start hitting the gym,” CBA national retail manager Jerry Macey told news.com.au.

“Aussie consumers are clearly motivated to make positive life changes, so January presents great opportunities for business operators in the health and wellness sector.”

Surprisingly, people take out even more gym memberships in February than January with spending increasing by 11 per cent. Perhaps because many people are still holidaying in January and the full extent of their festive fat hasn’t hit home.

But come March, all those promises crumble into a heap as we snub the treadmill for the tavern swapping weights for wine.

In January, the growth in gym memberships (the green line) is huge compared to the month before while alcohol and cigarette sales (the yellow line) are well down on December. In February, gym memberships are still growing compared to January, albeit by a lesser amount. But by March, booze and smokes are growing while gym membership sales have sunk. Figures: Commonwealth Bank

In January, the growth in gym memberships (the green line) is huge compared to the month before while alcohol and cigarette sales (the yellow line) are well down on December. In February, gym memberships are still growing compared to January, albeit by a lesser amount. But by March, booze and smokes are growing while gym membership sales have sunk. Figures: Commonwealth BankSource:Supplied

Gym membership sales plummet by 17.6 per cent in March compared to the high water mark in February. They then fall by almost 10 per cent in April further undoing the good work.

Booze and cigarette sales are also quick to creep back up following a January lull.

February sees sales shoot up by 6 per cent and then more than double that to 12.6 per cent in March.

Indeed, it’s March when the increase in alcohol and tobacco sales overtakes gym memberships which by that point are in free fall.

“Historically, our data shows a dramatic increase in gym membership sales during January but it’s important for businesses to motivate and retain customers as their resolve is tested over the coming months,” said Mr Macey.

“Typically, we see a drop off in health and wellness spending as we head into Autumn.

“Cigarette and alcohol retailers can expect a decline in sales during the January and February period, but are likely to see a rebound as the summer months come to a close.”

Yummy beer is tempting you to give up the gym.

Yummy beer is tempting you to give up the gym.Source:Getty Images

The reversal in our resolutions is despite the fact three quarters of us want to lose weight.

Research from Aussie Farmers Direct and WeightWatchers, released late last month, showed 74 per cent of Australians want to ditch the flab in 2017.

More than half wanted to lose as much as 10kg in 2017 with the most weight-conscious age group being 25-34 year olds.

But people know it’s not easy. The top three good intention wreckers were being overcome by temptation; staying motivated; and keeping the weight off once it’s lost.

The most weight-conscious state or territory is the ACT, with 88.2 per cent of residents wanting to lose weight while only one in two residents of the Northern Territory were that bothered about shedding the kilos.

There’s no point getting a gym membership if you’re not going to go says dietitian Susie Burrell.

There’s no point getting a gym membership if you’re not going to go says dietitian Susie Burrell.Source:Supplied

Dietitian Susie Burrell said she wasn’t surprised many people give up on their get fit plans come autumn.

“While we like to start a brand new year with the best of intentions, rarely are our health related resolutions — to eat less, drink less and exercise more — sustainable nor do they fit into the demands of modern life,” she told news.com.au.

“By February the pressures of life have built up again, there is not enough time in the day to do everything we need to do let alone go to the gym and many people rely on alcohol to help them manage stress.”

Ms Burrell, who runs the Shape Me online diet plan, said she had a simple solution to people who struggled to stick to a gym regimen.

“It is easy to join a gym, going is another story. So, if you don’t like the gym, don’t join one.

“Really consider the best type of exercise for you. It has to be close by, convenient and you actually have to enjoy doing it.”

Better than having a gym membership but never going, said Ms Burrell, would be to walk more.

“For most of us simply factoring more walking on a daily basis is the best, cheapest and easiest type of exercise to do.”

benedict.brook@news.com.au

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