‘I’ve become stranger and stranger’

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Norwegian mass murder Anders Behring Breivik makes a Nazi salute ahead his appeal hearing at a court at the Telemark prison in Skien, Norway. Picture: AFP

Staff writersReuters

NORWEGIAN mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik says he feels he’s become “stranger and stranger” and more radical in his right-wing views in jail and blames it on near-isolation since he massacred 77 people in 2011.

He expressed no remorse, however, for the massacre during a court hearing at which the state is appealing against a lower-court ruling in 2015 that the tough conditions violate Breivik’s human rights.

Anders Behring Breivik (32) leaves courthouse in a police car in Oslo in 2011. Picture: Supplied

Anders Behring Breivik (32) leaves courthouse in a police car in Oslo in 2011. Picture: SuppliedSource:AFP

Facbook photo of Anders Behring Breivik from 2011. Picture: Supplied

Facbook photo of Anders Behring Breivik from 2011. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

Breivik, who gave a Nazi-style salute at the start of the week-long court hearing on Tuesday, traced his feelings to a lack of critical feedback about his ideas while in jail.

“The last five years I’ve been completely isolated, not corrected a single time. I’ve sat in a cell 23 hours a day for almost 6 years … I’ve become stranger and stranger as a direct consequence of this,” he said.

“I’ve become a lot more radical while I’ve been jailed,” he said, agreeing with allegations by Norway’s attorney-general in the court on Thursday. He added that he was “shocked by many of the things I have written”.

police and emergency services gather following a massacre at a summer youth camp on July 22, 2011 on Utoya Island, Norway. Picture: Getty

police and emergency services gather following a massacre at a summer youth camp on July 22, 2011 on Utoya Island, Norway. Picture: GettySource:Getty Images

Despite the Nazi salute, Breivik said that his underlying commitment was now to democracy and peaceful means.

On July 22, 2011, Breivik killed eight people with a car bomb outside the prime minister’s office in Oslo and then shot 69 others on an island near the capital, many of them teenagers attending a youth camp of Norway’s then-ruling Labour Party.

Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik, making a salute after his arrival at the courtroom in Oslo in August 2012. Picture: AP

Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik, making a salute after his arrival at the courtroom in Oslo in August 2012. Picture: APSource:AP

Attorney-General Fredrik Sejersted told the court that Breivik had to be kept away from other prisoners because he was still dangerous and wanted to spread a neo-Nazi ideology from inside the jail.

He is compensated with a three-room cell, including a personal gym, television, newspapers and PlayStation.

Breivik’s lawyer, Oeystein Storrvik, said his client’s treatment, including strip searches and use of handcuffs, violates a ban on “inhuman and degrading treatment” under the European Convention on Human Rights.

Candlelight vigil for victims of the Norway massacre held in the city centre of Oslo. Picture: Britta Campion

Candlelight vigil for victims of the Norway massacre held in the city centre of Oslo. Picture: Britta CampionSource:News Corp Australia

Breivik was more subdued than in the previous court appearance in 2015 when he joked about suffering ready-made meals and cold coffee.

He is serving Norway’s longest jail term, 21 years, which can be extended.

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